MW Mobile Blog

For friends, family and the random search engine visitor. This blog started as an experiment in mobile blogging from my Palm TREO 600 700 Prē HTC Evo,Samsung 5. Now serving as a simple repository of favorite activities. Expect bad golf, good fishing, great sailing, eating, drinking, adventure travel, occasional politics and anything else I find interesting along the way including, but not limited to, any of the labels listed here...

Saturday, September 30, 1995

Africa Tour - Cave Paintings - Malaki's Law



Africa Journal


September 30, 1995

  Man astonished at snake with antelope head 


Malaki’s Law

The guidebook says this is the place to see cave paintings, so we opt out of the game drive for a historical tour. Malaki, a local Ndebele, is our guide. He sets the tone immediately by requesting that we not point at any of the hills. Some of the hills are sacred to the Ndebele, and to point shows lack of respect. Malaki impresses us with his depth of knowledge and deep respect for the traditions of the area and his people.




We begin with a short history lesson at a historical marker commemorating an Ndebele victory over a British expedition sent to quell rebellious tribes. We then climb a steep grade, clamboring over rocks, to a cave with a spectacular view of the valley below. 
 
Man with kill
 
The inside of the cave is covered with paintings thousands of years old. Malaki lectures with a quiet authority for almost an hour, about the cave, it’s history, the traditions, theories about the paintings and the rituals that surrounded them. By the time we go back down the hill, we are convinced that the failure to respect the traditions and ceremonies of the cave are the reason for the drought.




He takes us to the home of a man who has built a hut using the traditional materials and the ‘old ways’, which rapidly accelerating disappearance he laments. Then into a very small but bustling village where Sigrid takes photographs of the local people and their activities. She always asks permission to take their photos. A few ask for money, so she does not shoot them, but more are simply pleased to be asked, or ask to have a copy of the photos. We agree to send copies back to Malaki to distribute.

Back to the lodge for lunch and shelter from the afternoon sun. We rejoin Malaki’s tour at 3:00, but interrupt the historical narrative for a little rhino hunting. Malaki’s technique is to climb a strategically located hill, scan the valley for the rhinos, then drive/hike to them. Armin and I climb the first hill with Malaki, and search the valley until the car horn below tells us that Sigrid and the LA couple in the land-rover are impatient. The second hill Malaki climbs himself. He appears to run straight up the the side of the hill. A short while later he runs straight back down. From the bottom, it looks like the kind of physics defying maneuver you might see in a cartoon.




Still no rhinos, so we view more cave paintings, then finish the day with a sunset tour of Cecil Rhodes grave at the place Rhodes called World’s View. The spectacular 360 degree view of Zimbabwe is overwhelming. It is clear why a man of Rhodes ambition loved the spot and requested to be buried there. From there he must have felt the master of all he could see. 


Rhodes Grave

That night we dine with Malaki, Armin - a German living in South Africa, a couple comprised of a Brit married to a French woman living in Switzerland, and a couple from southern California. A very enjoyable dinner filled with good wine, good humor and storytelling. During dinner it became clear to me that Japanese tourists are bringing the world closer together. We feel a real sense of camaraderie with all except the California couple, which of course is due to the lack of any commonality of life experience or any other real basis for communication.

Malaki does not drink the wine but a concoction of his own invention: half Castle Beer / half Coca-Cola. Should you ever want to order one of these, you should do so by ordering it under the name given by it’s inventor - The Malaki Special. He deserves it.

Someone asks what I do for a living, and when I say software, the Europeans want to talk about Bill Gates. Well, he is  not my favorite subject, but he is a tremendous American sucess story, and it is important to be sure the Europeans understand just how great his accomplishments really are, so I express my admiration for all he has accomplished despite being only four foot six inches tall. I am astonished to find that they are completely unaware of this fact. The french woman mumbles something in French about Napoleon, and I agree. We all drink a toast to Bill.

We also spend some time discussing the logistics of managing multiple wives, one of the traditional ‘Old Ways’ staunchly defended by Malaki, who has two. He sums it up by proclaiming what will henceforth be known as:
 
Malaki’s Law.
‘ One Wife - Many Problems. Two Wives - No Problems.’

=================

NOTE FROM THE FUTURE:
This is a back-post / cross-post from my first on-line journal/blogging effort - a journal of our Southern Africa Tour in 1995. Originally posted here, the term "blog" had not yet entered the parlance. I am migrating the original posts to this blog. These links to the original journal Date Index or Africa Tour Home Page will likely eventually disappear. The images from the original post were screen caps from video which I am leaving as is for historical integrity. My intent is to add some of Sigrid's scanned photos to these blog back-posts.  

Friday, September 29, 1995

Africa Journal - Matobo Hills - Tracking with Jeffrey

Africa Journal


September 29, 1995




Matobo Hills - Tracking with Jeffrey
We leave Water Wilderness to Adrian and Cicely and catch the Trislander at Bumi Hills for the flight over the lake to Kariba Airport. There we must disembark and unload the luggage, check in with Air Zimbabwe, then reboard and reload the luggage back on to the exact same plane with the exact same pilot for the flight to Bulawayo. The Trislander loses much of it’s charm over the course of the 90 minute flight to Bulowayo.



The sign says "Anyone seen or suspected of POACHING ACTIVITIES will be shot on sight." 
The lower sign says "REMEMBER do not be mistaken for POACHERS". Good Advice.

We arrive at Matobo Lodge in time for the afternoon game drive/walk with Jeffrey. Jeffrey is a professional hunter, and knows all the guides that we have met on the trip. He takes us in a group of 8 into the Matobo Park Intensive Rhino protection zone. There is a herd of 70 rhino in the park. They are guarded by park rangers with automatic weapons. Poachers are shot on sight, as are tourists who are mistaken for poachers. No one is allowed to walk in the park without a professional guide or hunter, and the guide must report in before entering the park.

Jeffery finds rhino tracks and leads us through a field of dried yellow grass as tall as I am. We circle the field to get downwind and, in a clearing, find a white rhino cow with her 18 month year old calf. A very exciting sighting. I carve a third notch into the camcorder, now more than halfway through the Big Five.



Jeffery does not carry a rifle, as have our guides on previous walks. I thought that it was required by law and ask him about this. He explains that there is no point to carrying a rifle into a Rhino Protection Zone, becasue the penalties for shooting a rhino are so severe. In other words, while Zimbabwe values its tourists, it values its rhinos even more. I can’t argue with that.



Baby Rhino

=================

NOTE FROM THE FUTURE:
This is a back-post / cross-post from my first on-line journal/blogging effort - a journal of our Southern Africa Tour in 1995. Originally posted here, the term "blog" had not yet entered the parlance. I am migrating the original posts to this blog. These links to the original journal Date Index or Africa Tour Home Page will likely eventually disappear. The images from the original post were screen caps from video which I am leaving as is for historical integrity. My intent is to add some of Sigrid's scanned photos to these blog back-posts.  

Thursday, September 28, 1995

Africa Journal - Tracking with Petros

Africa Journal


September 28, 1995




Tracking with Petros
I am awakened during the night by the sounds of the hippos. At night they come ashore to feed. When one bellows, others answer in chorus. They sound like they are directly outside the door of the houseboat. I am losing sleep, but can’t stop smiling.

At 5:30 AM we are off on a game walk with Petros. He is a professional guide, certified the same year as Iona. On the trail of a breeding herd of elephants, ws have another close encounter. Despite the massive amount of water represented by Lake Kariba, the drought is still very much in evidence. We walk through a bone dry valley that was the original site of Water Wilderness. There is a wood structure in a tree that used to be an observation deck in the middle of a bay. I don’t think you can even see the lake from it now.We hear that if the lake drops another two meters, the hydroelectric power plant will be forced to shut down.


A Photo from the book "Spirit of the Zambezi" showing the original Water Wilderness, and the same site today.

After breakfast we bid adieu to Peter and Jane, who are heading home. For a few hours we have the resort to ourselves as Petros heads out to get more guests and supplies. We wile away the mid-day hours by paddling in the canoe and watching wildlife from the deck. On the deck, I smoke a Montecristo #4, and watch two plovers try to drive off a Fish Eagle perched in the highest branch of a nearby tree. I want to fish, but Petros could produce no bait.



Petros returns with Adrian and Cecily, newlyweds from the UK. They look exhausted but are game for combination boat drive and walk. Back in the speedboat, we find more hippos, and hike up a hill where we find leopard tracks, but no leopard. The hill overlooks the valley we walked through that morning. It is filled with game, mostly antelope and waterbucks. Sigrid then launches the definitive photographic study of a Lake Kariba sunset. Two rolls of film and two gin and tonics later, it is almost completely dark. Daniel somehow makes his way back through the maze of drowned trees to the houseboat in the dark.

=================

NOTE FROM THE FUTURE:
This is a back-post / cross-post from my first on-line journal/blogging effort - a journal of our Southern Africa Tour in 1995. Originally posted here, the term "blog" had not yet entered the parlance. I am migrating the original posts to this blog. These links to the original journal Date Index or Africa Tour Home Page will likely eventually disappear. The images from the original post were screen caps from video which I am leaving as is for historical integrity. My intent is to add some of Sigrid's scanned photos to these blog back-posts.  

Wednesday, September 27, 1995

Africa Journal - Matusadona Water Wilderness

Africa Journal


September 27, 1995




Water Wilderness

We decide to forego any game drives from Katete and take the morning to just relax and recover. We had not realized how exhausted we had become. I use the time to try and catch up on the journal which is now getting dangerously behind. On the last dial-in, I picked up a message from Harlan complaining bitterly about my shitty HTML and lack of planning for this project. He sent me an HTML template for future transmissions, and lets me know that the web page is up. He issues a demand for a carved full-size bust of a woman’s head. I don’t know that I will have any choice but to acquiesce in this blatant extortion. I guess I should make it clear that to the extent that this web site looks good, or is even functional, is completely due to Harlan’s efforts, since I really will not be able to view it until I return.

I get a call from Rob at Chokamella. I had left my power adaptor in the outlet there. He will see that it meets me two days hence at the Matobos Hills lodge. Another crisis narrowly averted. He also wants to let me know the cost of the phone calls as we had agreed. With this information, I now know just how badly I’ve been burned by the Sheraton in Harare. Almost ten times the actual charges for a comparable phone call. I’m pissed off, but will just have to deal with it when I get back.



At 2:30 we are picked up and driven to the lake shore. Charles, the driver, chides us for not going on a game drive and claims that we missed seeing two rhinos. We later discover that he may have deliberately confused the dates of that sighting. At the shore we are met by Petros, who will be our guide at Water Wilderness, and are off on a high speed run across lake Kariba in a massively overpowered speedboat.

Petros briefs us about the resort over tea on the "mother" houseboat. He warns us about staying clear of the hippos. The day before, the chef had been fishing too close to shore, and a hippo came up from underneath and bit through the canoe.



Then he gives Sigrid and I our canoe, and we paddle over to the houseboat that will be our home for the next two nights.

The facilities are a little primitive, but the setting is incredible. We are moored in a forest of drowned trees. From our deck on the boat we hear fish splash, and watch elephants and buffalo drinking on the shore. The bellow of hippos compete with the songs of birds.

After getting settled, we paddle back to the motherboat, and are off with Petros and the only other guests, Peter and Jan from Australia, on a game drive in the speedboat. I get some great video of hippos and a crocodile. Then to a rocky deserted island for sundowners and yet another spectacular sunset. Peter explains that the quinine in tonic water will help ward off malaria, and that I am making a mistake drinking Zambezis. Despite the fact that there are no mosquitoes, I decide that his logic is irrefutable and switch to gin and tonic.


 
 
 
=================

NOTE FROM THE FUTURE:
This is a back-post / cross-post from my first on-line journal/blogging effort - a journal of our Southern Africa Tour in 1995. Originally posted here, the term "blog" had not yet entered the parlance. I am migrating the original posts to this blog. These links to the original journal Date Index or Africa Tour Home Page will likely eventually disappear. The images from the original post were screen caps from video which I am leaving as is for historical integrity. My intent is to add some of Sigrid's scanned photos to these blog back-posts. 

Tuesday, September 26, 1995

Africa Journal - Katete Lodge - Lake Kariba

 

Africa Journal


September 26, 1995




Katete Lodge, Lake Kariba


Up at 4:30 to pack and head for the airport. Before heading out, I am able to get connected and send Harlan journal entries through 9/24. Rob and Shirley are fascinated by the Toshiba and the process. They ask for advice on Windows 95. I tell them to wait for the next release.

We sadly leave Chokamella Lodge. We were very impressed with every aspect of the Masuwe and Chokamella Lodges, which are both owned by the Landella Group. They work very hard to make your stay enjoyable and memorable. Well run, good food, and personalized service on the game drives. They don’t know how to say no. They’ll be hard to top.



An Air Zimbabwe Fokker 50 to Kariba Airport, and we connect on a charter across the lake to Bumi Hills. The charter is a Britton Lee Trislander with 14 seats, three engines, four doors and picture windows. It looks like it flew right out of a 1930’s era newsreel. Every seat filled, with inadequate ventilation, but still a fun 30 minute flight over the lake. The lake is huge. Formed when the dam was built in the fifties, it is populated with crocodiles and hippos. We spot elephants and buffalo from the plane. The runway at Bumi Hills is gravel, but the landing was smoother than many I’ve experienced at SFO.

It is hot. Really hot. We are riding in a open top jeep, under the blazing sun, up a rough dusty road to the Katete Lodge. I mean it is really, really hot.

At the lodge, we find that we have landed in the lap of luxury. We enjoy a very nice lunch with salad, gazpacho, and several glasses of white wine. In a heat and wine induced stupor, we float down the walkway to our room.


The room is beautiful. White mesh mosquito nets cascade from the tall thatched roof to form a canopy over the beds. Dark wood furniture and colonial style accents complete the romantic picture. Sigrid takes one look and says we are never leaving. We drink in the view of the lake and wildlife from our balcony, and collapse until sunset. Drag ourselves out of bed to photograph the sunset. Dinner and back to bed. There are no mosquitoes this time of year, but we use the nets anyway.


=================

NOTE FROM THE FUTURE:
This is a back-post / cross-post from my first on-line journal/blogging effort - a journal of our Southern Africa Tour in 1995. Originally posted here, the term "blog" had not yet entered the parlance. I am migrating the original posts to this blog. These links to the original journal Date Index or Africa Tour Home Page will likely eventually disappear. The images from the original post were screen caps from video which I am leaving as is for historical integrity. I've added some higher quality Sigrid's scanned photos to these blog back-posts.

Monday, September 25, 1995

Africa Journal - Tracking with Iona

Africa Journal


September 25, 1995




Tracking with Iona

Meet Iona. She will be our guide on the morning game walk and the afternoon game drive. I am grateful for the change, as it was just getting too weird having an LJE lookalike as our nature guide. I was experiencing Oracle flashbacks.

Iona is a professional guide. They take this term very seriously in Zimbabwe, where they have the most rigorous guide certification policy in Africa. To become a professional guide requires written tests, a two year apprenticeship to a certified professional guide or hunter, and an invitation to take the final exam. The final exam is a seven day practical in the bush that makes "hell week" at the Citadel look like a stroll in the park. All in all, about a four year process. Last year there were exactly six professional guides certified in all of Zimbabwe. One of them was Iona. She is 22 years old. Now Iona will be the first to tell you that she made some mistakes in the final. As a result, her certification is contingent upon her completing some additional tasks. One of those assigned tasks was to kill an elephant. She has completed that task.

Now Zimbabwe is not generally considered to be at the forefront of feminism. The country stands on the two legs of Shona tribal custom (women walk behind the men and do all the domestic work so the men can hunt and fight wars) and white Rhodesian colonial patriarchy (women are deferential and do all the domestic work so the men can hunt and fight wars). Between them, there is not much room for young female professional guides. Which makes Iona’s accomplishment even more impressive. There is a very good story to be told here, but you will have to come to Zimbabwe and hear it from Iona herself.


Our morning game walk was with a couple from the U.K. who, like us, were celebrating their wedding anniversary. It was their thirtieth and our third. We dubbed the walk the Anniversary walk. Iona loads her rifle (required by law when a Professional Guide takes a client on a walk in the bush), and we are off. We saw antelope, baboons, many birds, and spoor for what Iona called a "damn big leopard". The tracks were from the previous night. She tracks the leopard back through our camp where we find the leopard had walked within two meters of Iona’s door, and seven meters of ours.

As the heat begins to build for the day, Sigrid and I go back to our lodge to wait out the afternoon sun. I go for a dip in the pool, work on the journal and relax. We hear a snorting shuffling noise outside the room. I look out the door and see nothing. Sigrid suggests that it sounds like someone dragging furniture on concrete. I agree and go back inside. These are tracking instincts deeply rooted in city life.

A few minutes later, we hear Iona outside the lodge "Mike, Sigrid, Come quick. There are elephants at the pool." The pool is directly behind our lodge. I grab the camcorder and jump out, but can already hear Ray at the pool shouting and clapping. As I arrive the elephants are disappearing into the bush. There had been six of them. Ray was apologetic, but was not interested in refilling and cleaning the pool, as had happened when one of the elephants decided to take a bath last week.



It is time for the afternoon game drive. It will be only Sigrid and I with Iona. Iona has a glint in her eye. "Would you like to go find those elephants?" she asks. Soon we are off in the Landcruiser, tearing around the dirt roads that circumnavigate the property.

Iona finds spoor where they crossed the road. We jump out. Iona loads the rife, Sigrid loads the Canon, I load the camcorder. We are tracking on foot. We don’t speak. Iona moves quickly and quietly. Sigrid and I move less quickly and less quietly. We are trying to get downwind of the elephant's path. Iona stops and crouches, and motions us to do the same. She listens intently, and points. The only sound is the soft humming of the camcorder. In a few seconds, they are crunching through the woods directly in front of us.

A bachelor herd, six in the group. We are up and moving again, trying to stay downwind. We stop and crouch behind a tree on the bank of a dry river bed. Iona thinks they will come this way. Again we hear them. The lead elephant is just on the other side of the tree. The wind swirls and they stop. They smelled us. We wait. They wait. They know we are around, can’t see us, and don’t like the fact that we are hiding. Iona stands, and motions us back. The elephants start to move. I stop to shoot video. A big bull elephant moves past the tree, turns and looks directly at me. He is maybe 20 meters away, maybe less. There we are, eye to eye - or, more accurately, I’m looking him in the eye, he’s looking me in the camcorder. Iona starts talking softly to the elephant, or maybe she’s talking to me " Easy big guy. Easy".

It is just as he turns and starts walking away that I notice STBY in the corner of the viewfinder. I was not recording. Ok, so I got a great shot of an elephant turning and walking away. In a few steps the herd has moved up the opposite river bed and completely disappeared.


It is like a magic trick. Now you see them. Now you don’t.

 Back in the Landcruiser where we follow a trail that ends at the remains of an elephant killed in a hunt.


Bleached skull and bones, dried skin. Iona is distressed. It was probably a licensed trophy kill, but the hunters did not take everything as they should. Meat was left to rot. It should have been carried out and given to the local people, who are not permitted to hunt elephant.



Finally, back to the waterhole, where Iona produces a bottle of champagne and glasses. As the sun sets, we all drink a toast to our anniversary with the champagne. All except the elephant at the waterhole, who chose to drink water. I think I love this place.


A toast with a Pachyderm.

That night, dinner is served under the stars in the Buma, a circular corral of wood stakes.


 The tables are set up as a concentric circle inside the corral, and a small campfire burns in the middle. Dinner is grilled beef and chicken, with a variety of barbeque sauces, sudza, vegetables, salads and a red South African wine. Everything is delicious.


 Rob Clifford stands to toast the anniversary couples at dinner. They also baked us a cake.



To cap the night, we have Larry, I mean Ray, take us on one last night game drive.



=================

NOTE FROM THE FUTURE:
This is a back-post / cross-post from my first on-line journal/blogging effort - a journal of our Southern Africa Tour in 1995. Originally posted here, the term "blog" had not yet entered the parlance. I am migrating the original posts to this blog. These links to the original journal Date Index or Africa Tour Home Page will likely eventually disappear. The images from the original post were screen caps from video which I am leaving as is for historical integrity. I've supplemented those with some of Sigrid'shigher quality  scanned photos to this blog back-post.


Sunday, September 24, 1995

Africa Journal - Hwange National Park

Africa Journal


September 24, 1995





Hwange National Park

We decide to sleep in but, as promised in Andrea’s itinerary, We are awakened at 6:00 by the sound of birds. I recorded the sounds on my camcorder and someday will include on this page as an .au file. No alarm clock could be more effective.

Off at 10:00 on an all day game drive with Ray as guide. It is Sigrid, myself, and a fellow named Herbert from Germany. We are riding in a Toyota Landcruiser that could seat 10. Hwange is the crown jewel of the Zimbabwe wildlife park system. It borders on the Kalahari Desert and the dry dusty heat pulls the moisture out of you. The landcruiser is well stocked with refreshments, and Ray insures we are comfortable all day.

This was a great day of game viewing. We have many opportunities to get close up video and photos of zebra, antelope, elephant, giraffe and more. I believe we saw most of the animals listed in Andrea’s itinerary, plus some exotic birds, including an African eagle owl.



Larry, I mean Ray, serving lunch.

Ray served us lunch in a hide overlooking a waterhole. There were more than 50 elephants directly below us, drinking, taking mud baths, taking dust baths, stomping around, trumpeting, and looking us over while we were watching them. Sable, Ostrich, and baboons also visited. Ray chased a baboon out of another tourists car, who had left the door open while running into the loo.



That afternoon, at another waterhole, we watched a hippo chase a crocodile away from the remains of a kudu carcass. I have some video of this sequence which I will include as an avi file on this page when we get home.

We finish the day at a waterhole on the Chokamella propery watching the sun set behind a small herd of elephant. The elephants look like they are walking through fire and red smoke, as the dust they stir up is lit by the setting sun.

For best results, view while drinking a cold Zambezi beer

=================

NOTE FROM THE FUTURE: This is a back-post / cross-post from my first on-line journal/blogging effort - a journal of our Southern Africa Tour in 1995. Originally posted here, the term "blog" had not yet entered the parlance. I am migrating the original posts to this blog and these links to original journal Date Index or Africa Tour Home Page will likely eventually disappear. The images from the original post were screen caps from video which I am leaving as is for historical integrity. My intent is to add some of Sigrid's scanned photos to these blog back-posts. 

 

Saturday, September 23, 1995

Africa Journal - Chokamella Lodge

Africa Journal


September 23, 1995




Ray, could you bring me another Zambezi Beer, and make sure it is cold this time?

We fly to Hwange, and are greeted at the Chokamella lodge by Rob Clifford and his wife Shirley who manage the lodge. We heard many good things about Rob from guides in Victoria Falls and were very pleased to meet him.


We also meet Ray, who will be our guide for the game drives. I don't know if you can see it in these pictures, but Ray bears an uncanny resemblance to the CEO of a $5 billion dollar database software company we all know and love (If you need more hints, press here). Ray could be his little brother, it is really quite remarkable. I am sure he wonders why I keep asking him to do menial tasks and then start chuckling.
 


Eye-Eye, An African Eagle Owl

We take an afternoon game drive with Ray, and after dinner a night drive with Rob. On the night drive we park near a waterhole and turn off all lights. It is a moonless night and very dark. We hear a crashing in the wood behind the jeep. The sound gets progressively louder and continues for about a minute. Suddenly a big bull elephant walks out of the woods and passes within 10 feet of the jeep on the way to the waterhole.


We shine him with the spotlight as he drinks in the waterhole and Sigrid gets some great shots. A few minutes later, a hyena makes an appearance. We can smell the hyena before we see it.


Hyena & Elephant in the Spotlight

I am getting behind on the journal, just having too much fun.


=================

 NOTE FROM THE FUTURE: This is a back-post / cross-post from my first on-line journal/blogging effort - a journal of our Southern Africa Tour in 1995. Originally posted here, the term "blog" had not yet entered the parlance.   I am migrating the original posts to this blog  and the links to original journal Date Index or Africa Tour Home Page will likely eventually disappear. The images from the original post were screen caps from video. My intent is to add some of Sigrid's scanned photos to these blog back-posts.

Friday, September 22, 1995

Africa Journal - The Falls and the Fall

Africa Journal


September 22, 1995



The Falls and The Fall

We spend the morning touring Victoria Falls. First we take a spectacular tour by helicopter, then crossed the Victoria Falls bridge to see it from the Zambian side of the river. This is the end of the dry season, and after many years of drought, the water flow on the Zambian side is very low. The canyons and rock formations are impressive, and make up for the disappointing flow of water. From the bridge we can watch the whitewater rafts traversing the rapids hundreds of meters below us. The heat beats us down, and we retreat to the lodge to recover.



That afternoon we tour the Zimbabwe side with Jim and Julia from England. The water flow on this side is still very strong, and the lighting dramatic as the sun goes down. Sigrid takes too many pictures.


The view from the bridge.

You can walk from Zimbabwe to Zambia by crossing the Victoria Falls Bridge. At the center of the bridge is the "Africa Extreme" bungee jump operation. They claim to be the world’s highest commercial bungee jump at 111 meters. . . and yes, I did it.


I get strapped in by new best friend, Darrel.

Note the Excellent Form

Special Note to Chris Arisian - Thanks for the lucky t-shirt.

This is an AVI file of the jump. I can assure you the few seconds of postage-stamp video are not worth the 742K of download time, but hey ... knock yourself out:



=================
NOTE FROM THE FUTURE: This is a back-post / cross-post from my first on-line effort - a Journal of our Southern Africa Tour in 1995. Originally posted here, the term "blog" had not yet entered the parlance. I cut and pasted the original entry for this post, only substituting an updated YouTube upload of the videotape they made of my jump.